Utskrift från Malmö universitets webbplats www.mah.se

Recorded teaching resources – FAQs

Below is a list of FAQs about recorded teaching resources. If you can’t find the answer you are looking for, please contact the university’s legal counsel.

In the lecture hall
In our digital environments
My resources
Other’s resources
My employment 

In the lecture hall

Image from lecturehall

Do students have the right to record me and my lectures? Do I have the right to prohibit them from recording?

In general, permission must be granted for sound recording, photography, filming and similar recording techniques in lectures, seminars and other teaching situations. Students with disabilities, who due to disability require support measures, are entitled to make recordings. Such a need is to be communicated in good time before the lecture. For more information, read “Rules on students’ recording of lectures and other teaching situations (in Box)”.

What are students allowed to do with recorded lectures?

Your lectures are protected by copyright. Students therefore are not allowed to share a recording with their fellow students or spread it via the internet without your permission.

What happens if a student spreads their recording of your lecture via the internet, for example on YouTube, Facebook etc.?

By spreading your lecture on the internet, the student is guilty of making unauthorised use of your copyright-protected lecture. In this case, you can contact the administrator of the website that has uploaded your lecture and ask them to remove the material.

Do I have the right to record my lectures when students are present?

If you are thinking of recording students in lecture situations, you must take into consideration that the requirements of the Personal Data Act apply, because, among other things, a person’s face is regarded as personal data according to the law. You must therefore obtain the students’ consent in order to do this. It may also be the case that you have a student with protected personal data (classified information) in your class, and of course you are not allowed to spread information about them in any way.  

In our digital environments

There are a number of digital environments/platforms where as a lecturer you conduct teaching in various ways. What these have in common is that posted material and communication between you and your students are regarded as public documents. It is also important to remember that copyright laws also apply in these environments.  

What rules apply when I communicate with my students via the university’s learning platform?

The communication you have with your students via the university’s learning platform (Itslearning) are public documents. This communication (i.e. the information) is to be handled in accordance with the provisions of the Archives Act. This means that you cannot remove information indiscriminately. It is particularly important to consider communication that entails some form of exercise of public authority, for example matters that relate to notifications from students and examinations. As course director, you are also responsible for ensuring there is no illegal material on course webpages, such as copyrighted material that is not allowed to be there, personal data in contravention of the Personal Data Act (particularly sensitive personal data), material that contains racist or discriminatory comments, and comments that can be regarded as an unlawful threat or other criminal offences as set out in the penal code.

Do the same rules apply for other digital environments/platforms via which I communicate with students?

In principle, the same laws and regulations apply regardless of which environments/platforms you use to communicate with students.

Can I exercise public authority in all digital environments/platforms? 

The exercise of public authority, i.e. administration and decisions regarding examinations and other student matters, may only be conducted via the university’s learning platform. It is utterly inappropriate to handle such matters via Facebook, Twitter and similar channels. If a student contacts you via social media concerning such a matter, reply that you will contact the student via a private message and then do that.

Can I put up students’ personal data on my course page on the university’s learning platform?

In the normal activities carried out on a course page, you may use students’ personal data to the extent that is required to carry out your duties as a lecturer in that context. Avoid as far as possible using students’ personal identity numbers. You are not allowed to handle sensitive personal data either. Sensitive material is defined as personal data that reveals race or ethnic origin, political views, religious or philosophical convictions, union membership and information concerning health or sexual life.

What kind of material can I upload on the digital environments/platform I use in my teaching?

See below. 

My resources 

Who owns the teaching material I have created for my teaching sessions? 

According to the intellectual property rights of academic staff that apply in Sweden, it is you as the author of the teaching material you have created who “owns it”. However, the university has stipulated in a policy document that the university has a certain right to use it.  

What happens if someone illegally uses the material that I have created? 

If someone uses your copyright-protected material, that person is guilty of copyright infringement. This is regulated in the Act on Copyright, which also includes regulations on damages and so on. If you have discovered that someone has “pinched” your material, you are of course to tell the person in question as soon as possible and request rectification.

Do students have the right to record me and my lectures? Do I have the right to prohibit them from recording?

In general, permission must be granted for sound recording, photography, filming and similar recording techniques in lectures, seminars and other teaching situations. Students with disabilities, who due to disability require support measures, are entitled to make recordings. Such a need is to be communicated in good time before the lecture. For more information, read “Rules on students’ recording of lectures and other teaching situations”.

What happens if a student spreads their recording of your lecture via the internet, for example on YouTube, Facebook etc.?

By spreading your lecture on the internet, the student is guilty of making unauthorised use of your copyright-protected lecture. In this case, you contact the administrator of the website that has uploaded your lecture and ask them to remove the material.

If I make a film that I want to use in a teaching situation, will it then be viewed by the entire world?

As the author of films, you decide where they are to be visible. If you upload a film on the course page on the university’s learning platform, it will be visible only to those students who have access to the course page. However, if you upload it on YouTube, it can be viewed by everyone.

How should I respond if someone uses my recording in other contexts against my will? 

If someone uses your copyright-protected recording, that person is guilty of copyright infringement. This is regulated in the Act on Copyright, which also includes regulations on damages and so on. If you have discovered that someone has “pinched” your material, you are of course to tell the person in question as soon as possible and request rectification.

Student with digital pad

Other’s resources

How do I find, and how can I use, material to illustrate my lecture? 

The fact that images and other copyrighted material is accessible on the internet, for example via Instagram, YouTube and Google does not mean that you may use this material indiscriminately in your teaching. Some copyrighted material on the internet is covered by a Creative Commons licence. This means that to various degrees the author has given permission for cost-free use of the material. Furthermore, teachers have an opportunity through the Bonus Copyright Access agreement to use other’s copyright-protected material under certain conditions. There are also possibilities via other sources on the internet to find images, for example, that can be used under certain conditions.  Read more about copyright law and the Bonus Copyright Access agreements here.

Copyrighted material that is not covered by this may only be used in teaching situations if permission has been granted by the person or persons who hold the copyright.

Can I use students’ material?

Students own their material in copyright terms, which means that as a lecturer you are not allowed to use the material in teaching situations without the student’s permission. Consequently, you may not upload it on the course page as course material, use it in the classroom or publish the material on the internet without the student’s permission. Therefore, publishing in MUEP is not allowed without the student’s consent.

What rules apply for copying material?

As a lecturer, you may copy copyrighted material for teaching situations to the extent stated in the Bonus Copyright Access agreement. In addition, you may of course copy material when the author has given you permission.  

My employment

How am I compensated for my work?

The work you carry out to record teaching resources is categorised as planning work and normally compensated as preparatory work and afterwork with hours according to your position.

What happens if I change workplace, can I take my course with me?

As in general you will hold the copyright to your lecture, you may take it with you to your new workplace. (Sometimes other people are involved in the recording of your lecture, such as a photographer, who also hold the copyright to the recording, and this can complicate matters). However, according to the university’s policy, the university has a right to use the material, which is why you cannot prevent the university using it in teaching situations.