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Oral Hygiene Index (Greene and Vermilion, 1960)

Oral Hygiene Index -
(Greene and Vermillion, 1960)


Guest editor: Kaban Moslehzadeh

The Oral Hygiene Index is composed of the combined Debris Index and Calculus index, each of these index is in turn based on 12 numerical determinations representing the amount of debris or calculus found on the buccal and lingual surfaces of each of three segments of each dental arch, namely

  1. The segment distal to the right cuspid (see picture).
  2. The segment distal to the left cuspid.
  3. The segment mesial to the right and left first bicuspids.



The Maxillary and the Mandibular arches are each composed of three segments (these are illustrated above).

Each segment is examined for debris or calculus. From each segment one tooth is used for calculating the individual index, for that particular segment. The tooth used for the calculation must have the greatest area covered by either debris or calculus.

The method for scoring calculus is the same as that applied to debris, but additional provisions are made for recording subgingival deposits.



Criteria for classifying debris
 

Scores

Criteria

0

No debris or stain present

1

Soft debris covering not more than one third of the tooth surface, or presence of extrinsic stains without other debris regardless of surface area covered

2

Soft debris covering more than one third, but not more than two thirds, of the exposed tooth surface.

3

Soft debris covering more than two thirds of the exposed tooth surface.



 


Criteria for classifying calculus
 

Scores

Criteria

0

No calculus present

1

Supragingival calculus covering not more than third of the exposed tooth surface.

2

Supragingival calculus covering more than one third but not more than two thirds of the exposed tooth surface or the presence of individual flecks of subgingival calculus around the cervical portion of the tooth or both.

3

Supragingival calculus covering more than two third of the exposed tooth surface or a continuos heavy band of subgingival calculus around the cervical portion of the tooth or both.



CALCULATION EXAMPLE:

After the scores for debris and calculus are recorded, the Index values are calculated. For each individual, the debris scores are totaled and divided by the number of segments scored.

The same method is used to obtain the calculus index scores.

The following example shows how to calculate the indices. The scores for debris and calculus should be tabulated separately and indexes for each calculated independently, but in the same manner.

 

Debris
 

Right

Anterior

Left

Total

 

Buccal

Lingual

Labial

Lingual

Buccal

Lingual

Buccal/Labial

Lingual

Upper

3

1

2

2

3

1

8

4

Lower

2

2

1

1

1

2

4

5

Total

5

3

3

3

4

3

12

9

Debris Index = (The total of the upper and lower buccal-scores) + (The total of the upper and lower lingual-scores) /(The number of segments scored).

Debris Index = (12+9) / 6= 3.5


Calculus
 

Right

Anterior

Left

Totals

 

Buccal

Lingual

Labial

Lingual

Buccal

Lingual

Buccal/Labial

Lingual

Upper

1

0

0

0

1

0

2

0

Lower

0

1

0

2

0

2

0

5

Total

1

1

0

2

1

2

2

5

Calculus Index = (The total of the upper and lower buccal-scores) + (The total of the upper and lower lingual-scores) / (The number of segments scored).

Calculus Index = (2+5) / 6= 1.16

 



The average individual or group debris and calculus scores are combined to obtain Oral Hygiene Index, as follows.

Oral Hygiene Index = Debris Index + Calculus Index
3.5 + 1.16 = 4.66



A simplified version exists, the OHI-S (Greene and Vermilion, 1964).


Last updated by Gisela Ladda Tayanin