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Rebecka Hansson

Rebecka Hansson spent one semester at Babes-Bolyai University in Romania, a choice she hasn’t come to regret. She got to know a country she didn’t know much about and it gave her a more nuanced view of Europe.

Rebecka valde att läsa i rumänien.

What did you study at Malmö University?

BA in International Relations.

Why did you want to go on an exchange?

More like: why not? The main reason I wanted to go was the opportunity to spend a more substantial period of time abroad. I figured the exchange semester would be a way to experience everyday life in a different country. Another reason was that it felt important to gain an ”international experience” as I was getting a degree in International Relations.

How come you chose to go to Romania?

I’ll admit it was a bit unexpected. I got to choose from several universities and it was difficult. I had to pick a university that offered International Relations so in the end it came down to a few universities in Turkey and the Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca in Romania. It was a difficult choice but the fact that I knew less about Romania became the deciding factor.

What were the best parts and the biggest challenges? The biggest differences between studying in Sweden and Romania?

The best thing about the exchange was all the new friends and acquaintances I made in Romania. The biggest challenge was navigating the university since lectures and seminars took place in different buildings throughout the city. It was a bit tricky piecing together different courses that I found interesting and that Malmö University would let me count towards my degree, but it worked! The biggest difference between studying in Sweden and Romania was that there was more emphasis on what the lecturers said and less on individual study, so I had to be careful not to miss lectures.

Where did you live?

I lived in two different rooms with two different roommates in student housing – which worked out really well! Both were in the Haşdeu area where most of the student housing in the city is located. I can really recommend living in student dorms – it was quite affordable and it was nice being able to save and spend that money on other things.

What was the teaching like? 

Most of the time we had traditional lectures where it was important to take notes the whole time. The student groups on the different courses were quite small which was nice and meant that the relationship between students and lecturer was a bit closer. The courses I liked the best were Political Discourse Analysis, Dystopian Film and Fiction in the Euro-Atlantic Space and The Social Problem Film.

What was the most important takeaway from your time in Romania? 

A more nuanced view of Europe and a greater understanding when it comes to other perspectives.

What would you like to say to students thinking about going abroad?

Some students probably hesitate because they don’t know exactly what it will be like, but I’d say that that is part of the fun! There’s no way you’ll know how you are going to handle different situations and what you are going to learn until you actually go. Don’t hesitate if the place is one of the “less popular” ones - take the opportunity and go!

Last updated by Maria Wennerberg